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False Drops

Dear student workers and library patrons,

I know the finer points of the Library of Congress call number system can get fairly arcane. Not everyone can be an expert, and there are a lot of call numbers that look alike at a glance. But still, what makes you think that a book about soup belongs in the pattern making section, no matter how similar the call numbers are?

(And then they wonder why we ask them not to put the books back on the shelves...)

This rant brought to you by an afternoon spent in the stacks discovering lots of things that were not remotely where they actually belong.

This entry is also posted at http://owlmoose.dreamwidth.org/501771.html. There are currently comment count unavailable comments on DW.

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
taricalmcacil
Nov. 15th, 2010 10:58 pm (UTC)
Does the Library of Congress not use Dewey Decimal?
owlmoose
Nov. 15th, 2010 11:08 pm (UTC)
Nope, completely different. Most colleges and universities use the Library of Congress system; public and school libraries use Dewey. If your library's call numbers start with letters, it's probably LC. LC is less intuitive but allows much finer distinctions.
taricalmcacil
Nov. 15th, 2010 11:10 pm (UTC)
Ah, so that explains my schools library system. Interesting fact of the day learned!
darcenciel
Nov. 16th, 2010 02:11 pm (UTC)
Time for a shelf reading day!! XD
owlmoose
Nov. 16th, 2010 04:37 pm (UTC)
That's what I was doing when I found them!
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )

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